(c) SANS Internet Storm Center. https://isc.sans.edu Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 3.0 United States License.
 
[SECURITY] [DSA 3788-2] tomcat8 regression update
 

From time to time, we see spikes on some odd port in our data and we want to figure out what the bad guys are trying to do. Even just capturing the first packet or two of data can help us figure out what they are looking for, even if we dont initially give the proper response to capture the entire exploit. Sometimes, we can get lucky and the whole exploit is a single packet (yes, I remember SQL Slammer very well).It seems like everyone has their favorite way to capture the traffic, but they all seem to have weaknesses. So, I figured Id ask you, our loyal readers, for your favorites and any pros and cons to your favorite method. Do you put up a netcat listener (in a loop, so it continues to listen after the first connection attempt)? Do you use socat? Do you have a favorite perl or python (or bash or powershell) script? In my Truman-based automated malware analysis environment, I simply redirected every port to my IRC server perl script, but that isnt appropriate if were actually facing the internet. So, let me know what you think.

---------------
Jim Clausing, GIAC GSE #26
jclausing --at-- isc [dot] sans (dot) edu

Ill be teaching FOR610: Reverse-Engineering Malware in Columbia, MD in June (https://www.sans.org/community/event/for610-columbia-jun-2017)
and in Ottawa, ON in Sep (https://www.sans.org/community/event/for610-ottawa-sep-2017)

(c) SANS Internet Storm Center. https://isc.sans.edu Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 3.0 United States License.
 
[security bulletin] HPESBHF03709 rev.1 - HPE Network products including Comware, IMC, and VCX running OpenSSL, Remote Denial of Service (DoS), Disclosure of Sensitive Information
 
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