Hackin9
Microsoft is pitching another deal at pry-XP-from-my-cold-dead-hands customers, offering them $100 off a new Windows 8.1 device if they spring for one that costs more than $599.
 
A newly released, independent audit of Oregon's disastrous Obamacare website implementation takes both state officials and site contractor Oracle to task, saying each side contributed to problems that have generated a political firestorm in recent months.
 

Earlier this week, Ars reported on attacks exploiting an extremely critical vulnerability in the PHP scripting language almost two years after the bug came to light. By going 22 months without installing crucial patches, the responsible administrators were menacing the entire Internet, in much the same way as the owner of a blighted building might contribute to increased urban decay or neighborhood crime.

Now comes word of a new mass compromise that preys on even more neglected Web severs, some running versions of the Linux operating system kernel first released in 2007. According to a blog post published late Thursday by researchers from Cisco, the people behind the attack appear to have identified a vulnerability that has since been patched in later Linux releases that allows them to dish malicious content to unsuspecting people who visit the site. The quick-spreading compromise took over 400 hosts per day on Monday and Tuesday, and so far, Cisco has counted more than 2,700 distinct URLs that are under the control of the attackers.

"This large-scale compromise of an aging operating system highlights the risks posed by leaving such systems in operation," Martin Lee, a threat intelligence technical lead in Cisco's Security Intelligence Operations group, wrote. "Systems that are unmaintained or unsupported are no longer patched with security updates. When attackers discover a vulnerability in the system, they can exploit it at their whim without fear of it being remedied."

Read 4 remaining paragraphs | Comments

 
Multiple Asterisk Products CVE-2014-2287 Denial of Service Vulnerability
 
Multiple Asterisk Products 'main/http.c' Remote Stack Overflow Vulnerability
 
Spring Security ActiveDirectoryLdapAuthenticator Authentication Bypass Vulnerability
 
If the 'old' CIO had a reputation of throwing up barriers, the 'new' CIO must focus on breaking down barriers to show marketing, finance, HR and other business leaders how IT services can help them become better within their particular operations.
 
Android smartphones from all manufacturers make up nearly 80% of all smartphones recently sold worldwide, but iOS still dominates when it comes to Web browsing in the U.S. and other developed countries.
 
The White House, tech companies and others believe more Americans would take action on climate change if its affects could be visualized up close, down to its impact house by house.
 

Sony Pictures has purchased the movie rights to the story of the reporter who brought the Target credit card hack to light. The Hollywood Reporter writes that the company bought the rights to the New York Times story "Reporting From the Web’s Underbelly," a profile of security reporter Brian Krebs.

Krebs broke the news of the hack back in December, when approximately 40 million credit card numbers were stolen, reportedly as a result of a malware-carrying phishing e-mail. The Times wrote about Krebs' coverage of the hack in February.

As the Times article says, Krebs is deeply embedded in the cyber security community, with friends including Russian cybercriminals who "leak him documents about their rivals" and enemies who have swatted his house and "sent fecal matter… to his doorstep."

Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

 
A former Mozilla engineer who worked on the "Metro" version of Firefox says that poor adoption of Windows 8's radical user interface wasn't behind the decision to shelve the browser.
 
Be vewwy qwiet. I'm hunting sysadmins.

If you spend enough time perusing the Internet for helpful information on how to build a botnet or hack an online game, you’ll inevitably end up on a discussion board site filled with posts from various hackers eager to share that knowledge and build up their street cred. But even if you use Tor to explore the “dark Web” for such boards, you’ll never reach the 1337est board of them all—the discussion board hosted on the National Security Agency’s NSAnet.

The latest data dump from the archive of NSA webpages leaked by Edward Snowden contains a sampling of posts from the NSA’s internal hacker board by one author in particular—an NSA employee that The Intercept’s Ryan Gallagher and Peter Mass claim is the person who wrote presentations on attacking the Tor network. In one of his posts, the author outlines approaches to gaining access to networks used by individuals targeted for surveillance.

That post, entitled, “I hunt sysadmins,” provides a primer for NSA cyber-warriors to identify and target system administrators of networks to exploit their access privileges for the purposes of surveilling or attacking a target that is connected to them. The two-part post and others published by The Intercept show the extent of the NSA’s ability to target and exploit networks worldwide using the automated hacking tools at the agency’s disposal. But the new data also shows how similar the approaches of the NSA’s cyber-operators are to those used by “black hat” hackers and criminal hacking rings, and it offers some hints about the NSA’s internal “hacker” culture.

Read 10 remaining paragraphs | Comments

 
X2CRM Multiple Security Vulnerabilities
 
Microsoft promised to subject itself to a more rigorous process before searching through its customers' email accounts in the future after a recent legal case revealed that the company searched for evidence of theft of its trade secrets in a Hotmail account.
 
In theory, analytics should help firms make key business decisions. In practice, companies ignore analytics because it's likely to tell them the bad news they don't want to hear. This week, the actions of Gartner and Apple illustrated this point to CIO.com columnist Rob Enderle.
 
NCC00643 Technical Advisory: Nessus Authenticated Scan Local Privilege Escalation
 
Even as Apple CEO Tim Cook is blasted by some investors for not being the next Steve Jobs, the company's employees boosted his approval rating to the 17th spot on an annual ranking of the top U.S. chief executives.
 
Riverbed Granite 2.5 eliminates remote office server administration and backup pains by delivering iSCSI and Fibre Channel storage over the WAN
 
Siemens SIMATIC S7-1500 CVE-2014-2249 Cross Site Request Forgery Vulnerability
 
Samsung Electronics is laying the groundwork for the launches of the Galaxy S5, Gear 2 smartwatch and Gear Fit with hands-on demos in more than 61 countries.
 
China's Lenovo is buying up patents related to 3G and 4G technologies from U.S.-based Unwired Planet for $100 million, as the company sets about expanding with its proposed Motorola Mobility acquisition.
 
SabreDAV CVE-2014-2055 XML External Entity Injection vulnerability
 
SIEMENS SIMATIC S7-1200 CVE-2013-2780 Denial of Service Vulnerability
 
Twitter offered workarounds to Turkish users on Thursday following reports by users that the service was facing interruptions and possibly a block in the country.
 
Web servers running a long-outdated version of the Linux kernel were attacked with dramatic speed over two days last week, Cisco Systems said on Thursday.
 
Now that Microsoft has made OneNote free for consumers, can it compete with the well-known Evernote? Preston Gralla offers his take on both.
 
Mt. Gox has said it found 200,000 of the bitcoins it claimed may have disappeared as a result of a software flaw.
 
Twitter offered workarounds to Turkish users on Thursday following reports by users that the service was facing interruptions and possibly a block in the country.
 
Samsung is reportedly working on a variant of its Gear 2 smartwatch that works over cellular networks and doesn't require a Bluetooth or other connection to a smartphone.
 
Horde '_formvars' Form Input Remote Code Execution Vulnerability
 
Microsoft Internet Explorer CVE-2014-0307 Memory Corruption Vulnerability
 

Posted by InfoSec News on Mar 21

http://blogs.csoonline.com/security-industry/3082/secunia-vulnerability-report-questioned-experts

By Steve Ragan
Salted Hash
CSO Online
March 19, 2014

On Tuesday, the OSVDB project outlined various problems with Secunia's
annual vulnerability report, including instances where Secunia counted
vulnerabilities multiple times, or under-reported them. The project also
took issue with how Secunia classified third-party products, which the...
 

Posted by InfoSec News on Mar 21

http://www.networkworld.com/news/2014/032114-speedy-attack-targets-web-servers-279944.html

By Jeremy Kirk
IDG News Service
March 20, 2014

Web servers running a long-outdated version of the Linux kernel were
attacked with dramatic speed over two days last week, Cisco Systems said
on Thursday.

All the affected servers were running the 2.6 version, first released in
December 2003, of the Linux kernel, which is the core of the operating...
 

Posted by InfoSec News on Mar 21

http://freebeacon.com/chinese-police-university-trains-beijing-hackers/

By Bill Gertz
Follow @BillGertz
Washington Free Beacon
March 20, 2014

China’s main internal security and police university is training hackers
for cyber attacks, according to new information obtained by the U.S.
government.

The People’s Public Security University in Beijing, a part of the Ministry
of Public Security that trains all of China’s police and internal...
 

Posted by InfoSec News on Mar 21

http://rt.com/usa/syrian-hackers-reveal-fbi-microsoft-205/

RT.com
March 21, 2014

Syrian Electronic Army (SEA) hackers have reportedly obtained documents
that reveal how much money the FBI pays Microsoft each time agents try to
obtain or view an individual customer’s communication information.

The SEA, a group that has made headlines in the past for infiltrating
Western media outlets that it perceives to be against Syrian President
Bashar...
 

Posted by InfoSec News on Mar 21

http://www.sfgate.com/crime/article/UCSF-warns-nearly-10-000-people-of-potential-5332722.php

By Marisa Lagos
SFGate.com
March 20, 2014

SAN FRANCISCO -- UCSF recently warned 9,986 people that their personal
information may have been compromised after desktop computers were stolen
from the university's Family Medical Center at Lakeshore in January.

The unencrypted computers were taken from the Sloat Boulevard facility on
or around Jan....
 
Internet Storm Center Infocon Status