(c) SANS Internet Storm Center. https://isc.sans.edu Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 3.0 United States License.
 
Network Time Protocol CVE-2015-7853 Local Buffer Overflow Vulnerability
 
Network Time Protocol CVE-2015-7855 Denial of Service Vulnerability
 
Google Android Mediatek Driver CVE-2017-0616 Privilege Escalation Vulnerability
 
ImageMagick 'pict.c' Denial of Service Vulnerability
 
Network Time Protocol 'ntpq.c' Memory Corruption Vulnerability
 
Nextcloud/Owncloud - Reflected Cross Site Scripting in error pages
 

Enlarge / President Trump’s executive order on cybersecurity is built on the orders and policies of his predecessor, and is almost entirely apolitical. (credit: Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post via Getty Images)

Last week, amidst the whirlwind surrounding the firing of FBI Director James Comey, President Donald Trump signed his long-promised executive order on federal government cybersecurity. While many of the other orders issued by Trump have been politically fraught, this one is not; it's possibly the least controversial document to be adorned with the president's signature since his inauguration.

In fact, aside from some of the more Trumpian language in the order, this Executive Order could have easily been issued by the Obama administration. That's because it largely is based on policies and procedures that were spearheaded by President Obama's staff.

"My initial reaction to the order is, 'this is great,'" former National Security Council Director for Cybersecurity Policy Ben Flatgard told Ars. "Trump just endorsed Barack Obama's cybersecurity policy." Flatgard was one of the principal authors of the Obama administration's Cyber National Action Plan (CNAP), published in February of 2016.

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Enlarge (credit: Adrien Guinet)

Owners of some Windows XP computers infected by the WCry ransomware may be able to decrypt their data without making the $300 to $600 payment demand, a researcher said Thursday.

Adrien Guinet, a researcher with France-based Quarkslab, has released software that he said allowed him to recover the secret decryption key required to restore an infected XP computer in his lab. The software has not yet been tested to see if it works reliably on a large variety of XP computers, and even when it does work, there are limitations. The recovery technique is also of limited value because Windows XP computers weren't affected by last week's major outbreak of WCry. Still, it may be helpful to XP users hit in other campaigns.

"This software has only been tested and known to work under Windows XP," he wrote in a readme note accompanying his app, which he calls Wannakey. "In order to work, your computer must not have been rebooted after being infected. Please also note that you need some luck for this to work (see below), and so it might not work in every case!"

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The massive spread of the WannaCry ransomware last Friday was another good proof that many organisations still fail to patch their systems. Everybody admits that patching is a boring task. They are many constraints that make this process very difficult to implement and... apply!Thats why any help is welcome to know what to patch and when. This is the key:

  • What to patch? What are the applications/appliancesthat are deployed in your infrastructure?
  • When to patch? When are new vulnerabilities discovered?

The classification of vulnerabilities is based on the CVE (or Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures) standard maintained by mitre.org[1]. To explain briefly, when a security researcher or a security firm finds a new vulnerability, a CVE number is assigned to it (CVE-YYYY-NNNNN). The CVE contains all the details of the vulnerability (which application/system is affected, the severity and many more information). As an example, the vulnerability exploited by WannaCry was %%cve:2017-0143%%.

Those CVE are stored in open databases and many organisations are using them and provide online services like cvedetails.com[2]. There are plenty of them that offer almost all the same features but they don width:700px" />

Based on cve-search, I can provide details about new CVEs to my customers or any other organisationsjust by querying the database. Indeed, reading the daily flow of CVE is difficult and useless for many people. They have to focus on what affect them. To help them, Im using a quick padding:5px 10px"> email_contact | days_to_check | output_format | product_definition [ | product_definition ] ...

The script will parse this config file and search for new CVE for each product definition. Results will be sent via email to the specified address.

As I width:700px" />

Of course, the main requirement is to know what you are using on your infrastructure. The information used in the config file describes the products is based on the CPE standard[6] which categorisesapplications, operating systems and hardware devices. This information can be found byNmap. An alternative is touse the following tool on your own network (only!): cve-scan[7]. It scans hosts and searches for vulnerabilities in thecve-search database.

My script is available on my GitHubrepository[5].

[1]https://cve.mitre.org
[2]http://www.cvedetails.com/
[3]https://github.com/cve-search/cve-search
[4]https://hub.docker.com/r/rootshell/cvesearch/
[5]https://github.com/xme/toolbox
[6]http://cpe.mitre.org/
[7]https://github.com/NorthernSec/cve-scan

Xavier Mertens (@xme)
ISC Handler - Freelance Security Consultant
PGP Key

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