Hackin9

Are you looking for a tool to analyze Windows Portable Executable (PE) files? Consider using pedump a ruby win32 PE binary file analyzer. It currently support DOS MZ EXE, win16 NE and win32/64 PE.

There are several ways to install the ruby package; however, the simplest way is to execute "gem install pedump" from a Linux workstation. You can also download the file here or use the pedump website to upload your file for analysis. This example shows the output from the pedump website.

You can obtain the same results as this output with the command line version by executing "pedump --all  SetupCasinoRoyal.exe".

The command line version doesn't currently have foremost, hexdump or the disassembler function. However, you can get the same hexdump output by executing "hexdump -C SetupCasinoRoyal.exe" from your Unix system.

[email protected]:~/malware/casino$ hexdump -C SetupCasinoRoyal.exe |more
00000000  4d 5a 90 00 03 00 00 00  04 00 00 00 ff ff 00 00  |MZ..............|
00000010  b8 00 00 00 00 00 00 00  40 00 00 00 00 00 00 00  |[email protected]|
00000020  00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00  00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00  |................|
00000030  00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00  00 00 00 00 10 01 00 00  |................|
00000040  0e 1f ba 0e 00 b4 09 cd  21 b8 01 4c cd 21 54 68  |.............!Th|
00000050  69 73 20 70 72 6f 67 72  61 6d 20 63 61 6e 6e 6f  |is program canno|
00000060  74 20 62 65 20 72 75 6e  20 69 6e 20 44 4f 53 20  |t be run in DOS |
00000070  6d 6f 64 65 2e 0d 0d 0a  24 00 00 00 00 00 00 00  |mode....$.......|

This tool provides an easy way to dump headers, find packers and resources used by exe and dll, in the end providing a quick look inside suspicious PE file.

[1] http://pedump.me/
[2] http://pedump.me/89c10738fb44f9a529092bfa3c15dcf9/#resources    
[3] https://github.com/zed-0xff/pedump
[4] https://rubygems.org/gems/pedump
[5] https://github.com/zed-0xff/pedump/archive/master.zip
[6] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Portable_Executable

-----------

Guy Bruneau IPSS Inc. gbruneau at isc dot sans dot edu

(c) SANS Internet Storm Center. https://isc.sans.edu Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 3.0 United States License.
 
Attackers injected malicious code into Dailymotion.com, a popular video sharing website, and redirected visitors to Web-based exploits that installed malware.
 
Google's purchase of music streaming service Songza will be a boost for the Google brand as well its search, Play, Glass and other services. Maybe Apple could learn a thing or two from the deal.
 
Internet Storm Center Infocon Status