InfoSec News

Clearwire plans to conduct trials of LTE (Long-Term Evolution) network infrastructure, the company announced.
 
Only a year after its release, the Google Wave social networking tool has been discontinued, the company announced on Wednesday.
 
The U.S. Department of Agriculture's Rural Utilities Service has announced $1.2 billion in grants and loans for 126 broadband deployment projects in 38 states and tribal areas.
 
At first blush, Dell's E5510 Latitude notebook PC is a little on the pricey side. The configuration we tested--which includes 3GB of RAM (2.75GB usable by the 32-bit Windows 7), a 320GB hard drive, integrated graphics, and a crisp 1600-by-900 display--has a suggested retail price of $1490. That may seem a bit stiff, but when I checked the Dell Website, the unit was being offered at a discounted price of $1042--much better.
 
Microsoft and Salesforce.com have settled the patent infringement lawsuits the companies filed against each other, in an agreement that gives each company protection under its rival's patent portfolio.
 
There's little doubt that 2010 is the year of the iPad and iPhone for Apple, with the company largely focusing on the new kids on the block. But the Mac isn't entirely out of the picture. While the Mac business is a more mature product line than Apple's mobile device lineup, it remains an important segment--both to Apple and the customers who use the Mac. And though the four new iMacs (two 21.5-inch models and two 27-inch models) released in July provide only small speed boosts, these latest desktops will make most customers very happy.
 
Clearwire plans to conduct trials of LTE (Long-Term Evolution) network infrastructure, the company announced.
 
The Department of Homeland Security is quietly creating teams of experts charged with assessing the cybersecurity needs of power plants in the U.S.
 
The U.S. Department of Agriculture's Rural Utilities Service has announced $1.2 billion in grants and loans for 126 broadband deployment projects in 38 states and tribal areas.
 
A week in the classrooms of SANS Boston 2010 has shown Bill Brenner how much more there is to learn about the art of information security.
 
Hackers released code that lets iPhone 4 owners – if they have modified their Apple smartphones to load unauthorized apps -- to now use the devices on new wireless carriers.
 
The world's biggest bug bounty program today slapped a six-month deadline on vendors, saying it would release some vulnerability information, even if a patch wasn't ready.
 
With the push for larger mailbox sizes by users and increasing compliance requirements by legal departments, e-mail archiving is no longer optional for most organizations. But thanks to new technologies available in Exchange 2010 and Exchange 2010 SP1, including a bottomless mailbox capability and support for low-cost storage options, the need to deploy third-party archiving solutions is fading fast.
 
Kristin Harper's decision to become an expert in mainframe technology could prove to keep her employed during good and bad times as more and more of today's experts pass retirement age.
 
The U.S. Federal Trade Commission will announce an antitrust settlement Wednesday in its investigation of chip-maker Intel, the agency said.
 
Web security provider St. Bernard Software said Wednesday that it acquired managed email security supplier Red Condor.

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St. Bernard Software - United States - California Condor - Trade - TSX Venture Exchange
 
The emergence of an exploit used by a website for iPhone "jailbreaking" has prompted security researchers to issue warnings about smartphone security.

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iPhone - Jailbreak - Smartphone - Apple - Handhelds
 
The number of people using the Internet to find information about health topics has jumped from 154 million last year to 175 million this year, according to market research firm Harris International.
 
Cisco Security Advisory: Multiple Vulnerabilities in Cisco ASA 5500 Series Adaptive Security Appliances, impact is DoS.

Advisory ID: cisco-sa-20100804-asa

http://www.cisco.com/warp/public/707/cisco-sa-20100804-asa.shtml
Cisco Security Advisory: Multiple Vulnerabilities in Cisco Firewall Services Module, impact is DoS.

Advisory ID: cisco-sa-20100804-fwsm

http://www.cisco.com/warp/public/707/cisco-sa-20100804-fwsm.shtml


Cheers,

Adrien de Beaupr

EWA-Canada.com

(c) SANS Internet Storm Center. http://isc.sans.org Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 3.0 United States License.
 
Despite a blizzard of bad press about the iPhone 4's antenna, more than nine out of 10 consumers who have the smartphone are happy with their purchase, a pollster said today.
 
A document sent by Research In Motion to its enterprise customers offers insight on its decision to keep encrypted BlackBerry data locked down.
 
A way back in June I started a discussion on Vulnerability Assessment Testing Automation Part I. isc.sans.edu/diary.html?storyid=9091

In it I mainly focused on one of the primary port scanning and fingerprinting tools in use today, nmap. More importantly getting nmap data parsed and in a nice cozy database where we can query our hearts out, then correlate data points, and pump out snazzy reports. In this diary I'll extend the discussion to include Nessus, also a mainstream tool for performing network vulnerability assessment scanning. One of the issues I have had with Nessus for a long time is the reporting, and most of us write or use other tools to make sense of the reams of data you get from multiple Nessus runs. This one is no different. What it does is parse the newer .nessus V2 file format and import it into a database.



The script is here:

handlers.dshield.org/adebeaupre/parsenessusv2mysql.pl

It makes us of XML::DOM and DBI.



Usage: parsenessusv2mysql.pl xmlfile {dbname dbuser dbpassword}

The database name, database username, and password are all optional cli parameters, they can also be set by editing the appropriate values within the script.



I had been using a different script to parse .nessus v1 files, and was going to add it to this script as well, but changed my mind as I am currently finding it easier to bulk upload v1 files to the Nessus XMLRPC interface and then download them converted to v2.



Unfortunately it also needs some more work, but does the trick. I am more than open to suggestions, or better ways of doing things. Part III will be tips and tricks to using the Nessus XMLRPC interface from the command line. Part IV will be parsing other tool outputs for database import that don't have a fancy XML format. Part V will be the scripts and techniques to wrap all of the other parts together following a reasonable methodology. Let us know if you use this script, something like it, or some other technique to manage security test data. Contact us or use the comment fields below.
Cheers,

Adrien de Beaupr

EWA-Canada.com (c) SANS Internet Storm Center. http://isc.sans.org Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 3.0 United States License.
 
How will people work 10 years from now? Take a peek at Gartner's thoughts on big trends emerging in the office: Get ready for "work swarms" and "hyperconnectedness."
 
ArloG asked the Storage forum if one can backup more than one PC onto a single external hard drive.
 
Microsoft hopes to leap frog Android and the iPhone with reactive speech recognition capabilities
 
Considering reporting an incident?
Have you just received an incident report?
My, oh my... what are you to do?
Since I am unquestionably the arbiter of all that is good and right on the highways and byways we lovingly call the Internet, Iput together a handy little guide to help you through these trying times. Just think of me as the Miss Manners of Incident Handling. Only I don't wear a dress...
Very often...
Anymore...
What *NOT* To Do When Reporting An Incident

Cop a 'tude: Ok, I can certainly understand that you're feeling a little miffed 'bout the fact that someone took a whack at one of your machines, but really, in my experience, most (i.e. ~99%) of the time the responsible party is many steps removed from the people you'll be contacting-- so venting your spleen on the dude at the receiving end of your email or phone call is just bad form. Save that stuff for telemarketers. (Note: Yes, I understand that telemarketers are often good, wholesome, hardworking folks trying to make ends meet. I just don't care.) If you're all wound up and ready to take names and kick butt, then you're clearly an amateur at incident response. More than likely, that evil Eastern-block hacker with the slicked back hair and bad teeth that you're imagining kicking over your webserver is actually just an unpatched WinXP machine owned by someone's Great Aunt Margaret that got whacked by the latest version of SDBot. Keep the vent-plug locked down tight on your spleen... no one wants you gettin' Great Aunt Maggie all spleeny.
Get All Litigious: This is a subgroup of #1. In this case, instead of questioning whether the 'leet hax0r's parents were married at the time of his/her conception, you whip out the big guns, 'splainin' that you'll rain down all manner o'lawsuits, IRS investigations, and Papal excommunication on the responsible party. Trust me, if the FBI was interested in investigating your incident, you wouldn't be writing about it in an email to [email protected] Doing this just makes you look silly. Stop it.
Look Stupid: A good incident report tells a story: it tells exactly *what* happened and exactly *when* it happened. Stop hacking me! is not an incident report -- it's an exclamatory sentence that reeks of idiocy. Include IP addresses (and, if they resolve, machine names) in your report. Include port numbers. Include times (synchronized to something besides your best stab at clicking Ok while staring at Mickey's hands...). Include (or offer to provide) packet captures. You need to do the work so that the people on the receiving end of your report don't have to... or you'll be ignored. Notice: All of these things imply that *you* actually have a dang clue, have done your homework, and are monitoring your network at some sort of reasonable level. Wow. Who would have thought that you actually needed to know what you're talking about to report an incident?
Plant Your Flag: The Internet sucks when it comes to attribution. WHOIS tells you little and is often wrong about what it *does* tell you, IP addresses rarely reverse resolve, [email protected] email often appears to black-hole, and most ISP support staff gave up caring when they realized that I work in IT isn't really the chick-magnet phrase they thought it would be. With those kinds of odds against you, you're not gonna win many of these... I know it's frustrating when you have someone dead-to-rights and they simply dismiss you, saying, It's not us. Let it go. You've taken the time to try to warn someone about an incident, and sometimes, that's the very best you can do. Persistence isn't a virtue here, and if you cross the line and get abusive about an incident yourself, it can get you in really deep, really fast.
Blame TheVictim: Not everyone is as 'leet as you... nor are they as good looking, suave, sophisticated and debonair. (Very few of us are...) But, because you're also as intelligent as you are attractive, you know that you shouldn't look down on someone who got 0wned. It's bad karma, and as these things always happen, you'll undoubtedly be next. Offer help if the situation warrants it. Explain what they need to do if they seem clueless. But why am I telling you this? You're also kindhearted and generous to a fault. Aren't you?
Give up: We've all been there-- you look at the stream of evil stuff constantly raining down on your network, and you despair. All I can say is don't give up. You've reported incident after incident, and it appears to go nowhere. Trust me, I know. I run a honeypot system... I get attacked on purpose, and I've probably sent thousands of emails reporting incidents. It never fails: just when I get to the point where I'm feeling like I'm trying to sop up the ocean with a paper towel (and I'm ready to throw in said towel), someone will actually reply and say thank you. They come in all kinds of ways: I had a guy call me back about an hour after I originally talked to him when he was... well... a bit rude. He explained that he was very suspicious when I initially called, but when he actually checked out what I had told him and found out that he *did* have an infected machine on his network, he just had to call back and say thanks. Years ago, I actually got a very nice Harry and David gift basket from a company I contacted when they had a server compromised. While I wouldn't sit by the front door waiting for the UPS guy to bring you largess, trust me, someone out there does appreciate what you're doing.

What *NOT* To Do When Someone Reports An Incident

Cop a 'tude: While I fully support you being skeptical/wary when someone calls you out of the blue to report an incident, skeptical and rude are two different things. If the person reporting an incident seems to be asking intrusive questions, feel free to say I really don't feel comfortable answering that and ask them politely to provide whatever information they can. If it's someone trying to scam you, well... you've been polite to a scammer... certainly not the end of the world. But if the incident turns out to be real, you're gonna feel really, REALLY bad if you were rude and demeaning to someone who was just trying to help you out. (And, if you don't feel bad, then you should seriously start looking around for your soul... 'cause it must've fallen out of you recently. Look over in the corner, behind the filing cabinet.)
Get All Litigious: I once called up the Superior Court of an unnamed California county to report that their website had been whacked and was currently advertising both erectile dysfunction medications and hot teens (i.e. they had the sex and the drugs... all they needed was some rock n'roll...). After the normal shuffling back and forth to various people who assured me that this issue wasn't their responsibility, somehow I ended up being palmed off on some County attorney who proceeded to explain all of the legal hell he was going to rain down on me for hacking their website. My opinion of Mr. Lawyer wasn't improved by the fact that he was clearly in negative-clue territory in his understanding of how the Intertubes worked. I finally silenced him when he asked me How could you possibly know that this existed on our site if you didn't do it? by giving him a very simple string of text to type into the mythical oracle of all knowledge known as Google. Don't even think of accusing someone who *contacts you* of being the bad guy. Doing this just makes you look silly. Stop it.
Look Stupid: If I had a nickel for everyone who told me they couldn't be the source of an attack because they run a) a firewall or b) antivirus, I would have... well... a lot of nickels. (Probably not enough to buy me another nice Harry and David gift basket, but still... a lot of nickels.) Come on... antivirus? A firewall? Really? If you're in IT and you truly believe that the fact that you're running a firewall or AV has any bearing on whether one of your machines could be infected and attacking others on the 'Net, then I have a bridge for sale. Really. I do. It's very pretty. Trust me.
Plant Your Flag: Liston's Law of 'Net Karma: If you're stupid enough that, without checking, you would actually tell someone that an attack couldn't possibly be sourcing from your network, then the attack *is* sourcing from your network. Don't get cocky, 'cause you never know. If someone tells you that you have an issue, ESPECIALLY if that someone provides you with detailed information, check it out -- do NOT just dismiss it. Look at it this way: if your network is reasonably well-monitored, its not going to take you *that* long to confirm or deny... if it does, well then, your network isn't as well-monitored as you thought, now is it? Someone out there in Internet-land took the time to tell you that they think your network may be spewing badness -- the very *least* you can do is to look at some logs.
Play The Victim: You got 0wned. Something, somewhere went wrong. Man up (or woman up, but that just sounds weird...) and take 0wnership of the 0wning. It happened. Learn a lesson, fix something, and move on. Yes, you are a victim, just don't act like one.
Forget To Say Thank You: What? When your momma 'splained about manners were you spending your time pickin' your nose? (If so, you should've picked a better one... have you seen that thing between your eyes? Eeeesh!) Someone just did something nice for you. they just took the time to deliver it to you, and the least (the VERY least) you can do is acknowledge them for it. No one likes to learn that their network has been 0wned, but would you really rather NOT know? And for those of you in the if-I-don't-acknowledge-it,-it-didn't-happen camp, come on! (And yes, I know that this is actually POLICY in some organizations...) Remember: THEY KNOW! They told YOU! Do you really think that the mind on the other end of that email or phone call you received will fall prey to the Jedi mind game you THINK you're perpetrating by not responding? Oh, I guess since they never replied, those 5000 SSH login attempts never really happened... No! They're just sitting back and thinking that you're a pretty big jerk for not even acknowledging their effort to let you know 'bout the problems you have. Seriously folks, tell your corporate counsel to go play with their briefs and send out a thank you... you don't need to admit to anything: just say thank you for telling about this issue, we're looking into it. A little common courtesy goes a long way, and for those of us in the trenches who actually take the time to let people know about these things, a thank you email is a lifeline. Harry and David gift baskets are nice too.

Tom Liston - Handler - SANS Internet Storm Center

Senior Security Analyst - InGuardians, Inc.

Director, InGuardians Labs

Chairman, SANS Virtualization and Cloud Computing Summit

Twitter: @tliston

My honeypot tweets: @netmenaces (c) SANS Internet Storm Center. http://isc.sans.org Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 3.0 United States License.
 
The radio frequency band used to broadcast TV in the United States has evolved over time, primarily due to the Federal Communication Commission's desire to make more bandwidth available for wireless two-way communications. When the TV industry transitioned from analog to digital signals it freed up radio frequency spectrum, some of which the FCC auctioned off to wireless carriers. The rest, having been designated for unlicensed use, is known as TV white spaces.
 
Six people have been arrested for allegedly running a phishing operation that netted at least $569,000 and compromised more than 20,000 bank accounts and credit cards, the Metropolitan Police in London said.
 
Intel has reached a proposed settlement with the U.S. Federal Trade Commission in the agency's antitrust complaint, with Intel prohibited from giving computer makers benefits for exclusively using its chips.
 
Reports of an Android-based tablet from Motorola and Verizon have surfaced claiming the 10-inch device may be on store shelves by the fall. Motorola's tablet would be a direct competitor to Apple's iPad.
 
Saudi Arabia has ordered the suspension of Research in Motion's BlackBerry service as of Friday, as it does not meet current regulations, according to the country's telecommunications regulator.
 
At least 100,000 computers in the U.K. are infected with the Zeus malware, an advanced piece of spying software that is regularly defeating most antivirus software suites, according security vendor Trusteer.
 
The U.S. Federal Trade Commission will announce an antitrust settlement Wednesday in its investigation of chip-maker Intel, the agency said.
 
Hyperic 4.4 lets IT admins track performance problems across physical, virtual and private cloud infrastructures.
 
The recent publication of classified military documents on WikLeaks should not be allowed to chill information-sharing within the military and intelligence communities, retired Gen. Michael Hayden said.
 
NitroSecurity combines a wealth of log management functionality with outstanding versatility in graphs and views
 
The well-rounded LogRhythm XM appliance is feature-rich and flexible, from log collection to analysis
 
Splunk doesn't have all the features of the top competitors, but pairs good value with an active development community
 
ArcSight, LogRhythm, and NitroSecurity lead a strong field in mining event log data for security alerting, compliance auditing, and countless other uses
 
Trustwave's SIEM-in-one-appliance provides a great deal of functionality for the price
 
The LogLogic MX3020 appliance is not as feature-rich as some of the competition, but covers the essentials with great ease
 
ArcSight Logger 4 meets all the requirements of enterprise-grade log management, with plenty of flexibility and options
 
GFI EventsManager lacks enterprise features, but is a good software solution for small and midsize businesses
 
The British government has rejected a call to dump Microsoft's Internet Explorer 6 (IE6), saying that it is saving taxpayers' money by staying with the nine-year-old browser.
 
Saudi Arabia has ordered the suspension of Research in Motion's BlackBerry service as of Friday, as it does not meet current regulations, according to the country's telecommunications regulator.
 
InfoSec News: [HITB-Ann] Reminder: HITB2010 Malaysia Call for Papers Closing August 9th: Forwarded from: Hafez Kamal <aphesz (at) hackinthebox.org>
This is a reminder that the Call for Papers for Asia's largest network security event, HITBSecConf2010 - Malaysia is closing on the 9th of August!
This will be a QUAD TRACK conference featuring 2 dedicated tracks [...]
 
InfoSec News: Emirates to block most BlackBerry services: http://fcw.com/articles/2010/08/03/united-arab-emirates-block-blackberry.aspx
By Henry Kenyon FCW.com August 03, 2010
The United Arab Emirates will soon suspend most functions for BlackBerry mobile phones, in a dispute over access to the smart phone's communications. [...]
 
InfoSec News: Security Specialists Support Cyberwarfare: http://www.informationweek.com/news/security/management/showArticle.jhtml?articleID=226500187
By Mathew J. Schwartz InformationWeek August 3, 2010
"Nuke 'em."
That's the surprising -- albeit paraphrased -- finding of a recent survey conducted by Sophos, asking information security aficionados for their perspective on so-called cyberwarfare, and whether or not they think nation states have a right to spy on or attack each other online.
The survey results were detailed by Sophos Tuesday in a report outlining information security trends for the first half of 2010.
Interestingly, nearly two-thirds of the more than 1,000 people surveyed In addition, 49% of respondents think that "crippling denial of service attacks against another country's communication or financial websites" is okay during wartime, and 7% think it's acceptable during peacetime, too. Furthermore, 9% say their country should be able to hack into foreign companies and spy -- for economic advantage -- during peacetime, jumping to 32% during wartime.
[...]
 
InfoSec News: Botnet with 60GB of stolen data cracked wide open: http://www.theregister.co.uk/2010/08/02/mumba_botnet_infiltrated/
By Dan Goodin in San Francisco The Register 2nd August 2010
Researchers have cracked open a botnet that amassed more than 60GB of passwords and other stolen data, even as it cloaked itself using a [...]
 
InfoSec News: Former NSA, CIA Director Says Intelligence-Gathering Isn't Cyberwar: http://www.darkreading.com/security/cybercrime/showArticle.jhtml?articleID=226400063
By Tim Wilson DarkReading July 30, 2010
LAS VEGAS, NEVADA -- Black Hat USA 2010 -- There's a difference between the gathering of foreign intelligence -- the spy game -- and outright [...]
 
InfoSec News: [Dataloss Weekly Summary] Week of Sunday, July 25, 2010: ========================================================================
Open Security Foundation - DataLossDB Weekly Summary Week of Sunday, July 25, 2010
6 Incidents Added.
======================================================================== [...]
 
InfoSec News: Microsoft sticks to plan, denies emergency patch for XP SP2: http://www.computerworld.com/s/article/9180107/Microsoft_sticks_to_plan_denies_emergency_patch_for_XP_SP2
By Gregg Keizer Computerworld August 3, 2010
Although some had hoped that Microsoft would violate its own patching policy, the company yesterday stuck to its guns and declined to provide [...]
 
InfoSec News: How to Steal Corporate Secrets in 20 Minutes: Ask: http://www.csoonline.com/article/601615/how-to-steal-corporate-secrets-in-20-minutes-ask
By Robert McMillan IDG News Service July 30, 2010
A few companies in the Fortune 500 need to upgrade their Web browsers. And while they're at it, a little in-house training on social [...]
 

Posted by InfoSec News on Aug 04

Forwarded from: Hafez Kamal <aphesz (at) hackinthebox.org>

This is a reminder that the Call for Papers for Asia's largest network
security event, HITBSecConf2010 - Malaysia is closing on the 9th of
August!

This will be a QUAD TRACK conference featuring 2 dedicated tracks
focusing on cutting edge attack and defense techniques, a track with
dedicated hands-on lab sessions and a brand new lightning talk segment!

HITB CFP:...
 

Posted by InfoSec News on Aug 04

http://fcw.com/articles/2010/08/03/united-arab-emirates-block-blackberry.aspx

By Henry Kenyon
FCW.com
August 03, 2010

The United Arab Emirates will soon suspend most functions for BlackBerry
mobile phones, in a dispute over access to the smart phone's
communications. In an announcement this Sunday, the Emirate's
Telecommunications Regulatory Authority stated that on Oct. 11, it will
block mobile services such as e-mail and text messaging,...
 

Posted by InfoSec News on Aug 04

http://www.informationweek.com/news/security/management/showArticle.jhtml?articleID=226500187

By Mathew J. Schwartz
InformationWeek
August 3, 2010

"Nuke 'em."

That's the surprising -- albeit paraphrased -- finding of a recent
survey conducted by Sophos, asking information security aficionados for
their perspective on so-called cyberwarfare, and whether or not they
think nation states have a right to spy on or attack each other...
 

Posted by InfoSec News on Aug 04

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2010/08/02/mumba_botnet_infiltrated/

By Dan Goodin in San Francisco
The Register
2nd August 2010

Researchers have cracked open a botnet that amassed more than 60GB of
passwords and other stolen data, even as it cloaked itself using a
state-of-the-art technique known as fast flux.

When its command-and-control server was infiltrated, the Mumba botnet
had snagged more than 55,000 PCs, according to the researchers...
 

Posted by InfoSec News on Aug 04

http://www.darkreading.com/security/cybercrime/showArticle.jhtml?articleID=226400063

By Tim Wilson
DarkReading
July 30, 2010

LAS VEGAS, NEVADA -- Black Hat USA 2010 -- There's a difference between
the gathering of foreign intelligence -- the spy game -- and outright
cyberwarfare, a former CIA director told an audience here yesterday.

Gen. Michael Hayden, who has served as the director of the National
Security Agency and the Central...
 

Posted by InfoSec News on Aug 04

========================================================================

Open Security Foundation - DataLossDB Weekly Summary
Week of Sunday, July 25, 2010

6 Incidents Added.

========================================================================

DataLossDB is a research project aimed at documenting known and reported data loss incidents world-wide. The Open
Security Foundation asks for contributions of new incidents and new data for...
 

Posted by InfoSec News on Aug 04

http://www.computerworld.com/s/article/9180107/Microsoft_sticks_to_plan_denies_emergency_patch_for_XP_SP2

By Gregg Keizer
Computerworld
August 3, 2010

Although some had hoped that Microsoft would violate its own patching
policy, the company yesterday stuck to its guns and declined to provide
a fix for a critical bug to users running Windows XP Service Pack 2
(SP2).

On Monday, Microsoft shipped an emergency patch for the Windows shortcut...
 

Posted by InfoSec News on Aug 04

http://www.csoonline.com/article/601615/how-to-steal-corporate-secrets-in-20-minutes-ask

By Robert McMillan
IDG News Service
July 30, 2010

A few companies in the Fortune 500 need to upgrade their Web browsers.
And while they're at it, a little in-house training on social
engineering wouldn't be a bad idea, either.

Social engineering hackers -- people who trick employees into doing and
saying things that they shouldn't -- took their best...
 
Facebook has decided to double the size of its planned data center in Oregon before the first part of the project is even built, the latest sign of the company's rapid growth.
 
Google has fixed a flaw in its Audio CAPTCHA software that could have given scammers a way to automatically set up phoney accounts with the company's services.
 

Internet Storm Center Infocon Status